Tag Archives: watercolour

Staying ever curious

P1030781Small watercolour, 20 x 20 cm

I’m sitting in the gallery for another days stewarding, spending my time making some new work and chatting to visitors. I thought I would reproduce the introduction to the exhibition that Mary Blue Brady has written. Mary has identified, and written, about the concept behind the exhibition so succinctly that I thought you might like to read it for yourselves.

‘Moments of Being.

The title for this exhibition is taken from a collection of autobiographical essays by British modernist author Virginia Woolf. The collection was first found in the papers of her husband, used by Quentin Bell in his biography of Virginia Woolf, published in 1972.

Virginia Woof was a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness and this exhibition celebrates the heightened state of consciousness experienced when one feels most alive. Both Caroline Fisher’s porcelain landscapes and Debbie Lyddon’s mixed media cloths share common ground in commemorating moments of focus felt by the artists when visiting the North Norfolk coast.

Both artists have inventive approaches to their chosen materials and employ them to create a sense of wonder and impart an atmospheric response, drawing attention to a moon rise, a flash of water, or the rustling of halyards on boats, for example. In short, these artists raise our awareness of what surrounds us.

Caroline and Debbie’s work also prompts us to remember the preciousness of time, to savour each moment and to tune into individual occasions through deeper observation. For us mere mortals, it is imperative not just to look down at our feet, but also to gaze up at the stars, staying ever curious and open to the wonder of the world.’

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Exhibition

At very short notice, I have been given the opportunity to show my Moments of Being work here in Wells-next-the-Sea. I am absolutely delighted about this as this is the place that inspired the whole body of work and it will be the first time that it has been shown here.

Moments of Being is inspired by a series of vividly remembered encounters and engagements with the marshes and beach here in Wells and each work notates the memory of a commonplace event or observation: the sun moving over the marsh and creating shadows, the clink of halyards knocking against masts, the shape of a bend in the creek, or the way saltwater marks my clothes. These are not unusual experiences, but are personal and intensely remembered moments.

I will be showing The Sluice Creek Cloths which are large wall hung cloth pieces….

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several new Marshscape Collages….

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some Salt Works….

Debbie Lyddon Liminal Objects - Wrack

and some new small Watercolours

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I will be in the gallery almost everyday and  will be setting up a mini studio in a corner. There will be sketchbooks to look at and I will be drawing, painting and making work for the duration of the exhibition.

Moments of Being is on from 14 March – 6 April 2019 at Handa Gallery, Wells Maltings, Staithe Street, Wells-next-the-Sea, Norfolk NR23 1AU

 

 

 

 

 

Cley/Clay

Cley Beach, February 27: Unseasonably warm weather – the car thermometer tells me it is 16 degrees C.

Clear blue sky, clear blue sea.

A pale blue sea haar obscures the horizon so that sea and sky become one.

Gentle NW wind with a slight nip.

Lazy waves

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It is only about an hour after high tide, so I have to walk along the top of the shingle ridge. Just below, recent big tides have dragged the stones down the beach in huge arching wave patterns to reveal the sand beneath. The incoming waves fill the pebble curves as they break, and it is obvious how their dragging action has shifted the stones to draw sweeping arcs right along the beach. In places, higher, dark shadowed ridges run parallel to the pebbles. Here, the sea has worn away the loose top surface to reveal the clay bed underneath.

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The name, Cley-next-the-Sea is a corruption of the Anglo-Saxon word Claeg or Clay, and today the clay is truly next to the sea. I am surprised to see thick veins of white clay running through the usual red and looking closer I see that the red clay is also tipped with grey.

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I have no camera or sketchbook with me to record this but sitting on the shingle ridge with the sun on my back I imagine a cloth, rubbed with a slick wet mixture of soft clay: a deep dark terracotta red merging into softer yellow/white – textured, red and luscious. Walking back to the car across the dyke I decide to drive back to the beach and collect some of the clay with which to colour a piece of work. I pick up just enough red clay and white clay to colour one cloth. I don’t take any of the grey clay and now that I’m at home I’m beginning to regret it.

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This morning in the studio I draw some lightening quick sketches, ideas for a possible clay-ed cloth. I wonder what it will be…..?

Dusk

A grey day of dull flat light.

Late afternoon.

A walk along the footpath by the pines at the back of the beach.

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The rustle of dry branches and the steady, hushed tramp of boots on a slightly sticky surface is accompanied by the gentle chattering of pink-footed geese as they fly overhead to their night-time roost.

It is peaceful in the almost quiet stillness.

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Behind me, on the horizon, is a thin clearing of clouds. The dropping sun appears below, a scant semi-circle of glowing light that is diffused softly through the surrounding sky.

I walk on. And look round. Brighter now. In the clear sky is a line of brilliant orange, a streak of golden colour in a grey world.

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I walk on. Tall reeds and spiky blackthorn to my right. I glance round and look through the lacework vegetation turned black by the brilliant light beyond.

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I walk on. And look round again. The heavy sun sits poised between cloud and horizon. A burning sphere waiting to drop.

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I walk on. Moments later the light dissolves. I turn yet again. The sun has gone down below the horizon leaving a final blush of colour.

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I walk on. The light flatter, and greyer than before.

An artist in action

I thought I’d show you what I got up to on the ArtVanGo, Artists in Action stand at the Knitting & Stitching show last Saturday.

IMG_3454Seacoal, Cley clay, synthetic Indigo watercolour, graphite

The brief was to ‘do what you would be doing in your studio‘, and so as recently I have been continuing my exploration of how I can use pigments gathered from the landscape in my work, that’s what I did.

I started by grinding up red clay from the beach at Cley (I ground two batches of this: fine and coarse) and seacoal from Wells beach (fine) and then made watercolour paint with it by adding gum arabic and honey …. I made quite a lot.

IMG_3464Seacoal, Cley clay, graphite

With paint in hand I started painting on Khadi paper supplied by ArtVanGo, first small pieces and then longer ones.

IMG_3450Seacoal, Cley clay, synthetic Indigo watercolour, graphite

Each day, as I look out of the studio window, I see the creek slowly fill and then empty as   the tide comes in and goes out each day. The muddy marsh banks and creek bed are marked by the outgoing tide with hundreds of small ‘marsh rivers’ as the water drains off the banks into the channel. The soft mud is moulded and cut through as its surface changes twice daily. I am reminded of this quote by Ian Scott and Richard Worsley from their book, The Return of the Tide

‘This is a landscape in flux. Dunes creep. New channels cut the sandflats and slow, glassy tides spread thin smears of mud to build slick upon slick into new marsh.’

I am trying to evoke the marsh surface and the movement of water in these drawings.

IMG_3461Seacoal, Cley clay, synthetic Indigo watercolour, graphite

I use a lot of water and a lot of paint and let it mingle and move. The coarsely ground pigment separates out as it is swilled around in the water.

IMG_3459Seacoal, Cley clay, synthetic Indigo watercolour, graphite

Unfortunately I can’t make my own blue paint from local earths and rocks, so I have used a ready made indigo paint to add a contrast to the earth colours. A wax resist adds light and another texture.

IMG_3460Seacoal, Cley clay, graphite

My aim is to try and get the same diffuse, drippy effect on cloth as I have here on paper.

It’s amazing how much you can get done when you stand at a table for most of the day working!

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Out in the open air

Recently I have been re-reading books, that in the past, have been helpful in contextualising and backing up my practice. I am currently trying to ‘place’ the work I am doing at the moment and for some reason the reading isn’t helping.

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The solution, as is often the case, is to get out into the open and to feel the air, walk on the ground and to mingle with them.

‘in this mingling, as we live and breathe, the wind, light, and moisture of the sky bind with the substances of the earth in the continual forging of a way through the tangle of lifelines that comprise the land’. Tim Ingold, Being Alive

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To experience the landscape first hand is, for me, always the starting point. It is the place where you can let your senses and your imagination wander – to find something inside of you where there was nothing before and to find what you were searching for.

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Reading certainly has its place, but at the moment going out, looking, hearing and touching the landscape and then responding to those experiences moves me forward in a more fulfilling way.

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These were watercolours done in the studio immediately after a sustaining and refreshing walk.

Out of the window

I seem to have had a lot of waiting around recently – waiting for paint to dry, waiting for plaster to dry and waiting for clay to harden. With time to spare I’ve taken a cup of coffee, my sketchbook and paintbox and have been recording what I see out of the studio window. The ‘bones’ of the view rarely changes: look left, right or straight ahead, but the light, the weather and what my eyes alight on at any one time is different each time.

Here are the last six sketchbook drawings.

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