Tag Archives: Brisons Veor

Brisons Veor – Seaweed

From my sketchbook:

‘Priest’s Cove – they say every seventh wave is a big one. I count – it’s not true in this case. There are big and small waves, but they are random. Two big ones together and then a series of small ones. Every now and then a piece of seaweed gets washed ashore and dumped on the concrete slipway – kelp I think.’

‘Sennen Cove – seaweed fronds have caught on the iron girders supporting the ramp to the lifeboat station and hang flapping in the wind. They are all different colours: red, green, brown, yellow, grey.  Dried and waved. Gentle quivers of frond on frond and louder smacks as the wind blows it up against the metal.’


Using material that is collected directly from the landscape is a very important part of my practice. It creates a direct connection between the environment itself, my experience of the environment and the work. It is the medium through which I try to evoke the sensuous qualities of a landscape in a multi-sensorial way.

I saw one seaweed in particular all along this part of the coast in Cornwall. It is called Oarweed or Tangle – Laminaria digitata, it is a type of kelpIt can be found attached to rocks at the lowest tidal level and is often washed ashore. It has smooth, thick, cylindrical, flexible stalks which expand into leathery, oar-shaped blades that divide again into many finger-like fronds.


From my sketchbook:

‘Looking out just beyond the breaking waves at Priest’s Cove I can see the seaweed’s dark fronds swaying just below the surface of the water. A graceful, undulating dance that moves in time with the continuous play of the waves.’


Seaweed is a material that embodies the coast. I gather a large armful of wet, slippery stalks and fronds to take back to the studio. It smells faintly of the sea – not unpleasant, and it weeps a wet, sticky residue – rather unpleasant.

I know that when seaweed dries it becomes hard and leathery. I also know that it can be re-hydrated once dry. This characteristic has been put to good use as a traditional way of forecasting the weather. If the seaweed is wet and slippery rain is due and if it is dry and brittle, the weather will be fine. It has the possibility of being a versatile material that changes with the humidity of the atmosphere. It could have great potential for me.


I cut some fronds and sew them tightly together. It’s a messy business as this seaweed is glutinous and sticky. I leave it hanging over the banister and it takes about 2 days to completely dry. It shrinks. It curls. It’s wonderful. I try again with another piece. This time I cut the fronds to the same size and press them under a heavy book when I’ve finished stitching. This piece takes about 3 days to dry. It is also wonderful.


These small samples are brittle and have cracked on the journey back from Cornwall, but I know that if I wet them they will become supple again. I have a couple of bags of kelp drying in the garage. I will definitely be making something out of this unconventional material.


Brisons Veor – Drawing

Notes from my sketchbook:

Black rocks

Lichen splattered at the top

Deep, dark cracks

Waves on the rocks – coming in fast

Rocks jagged at the top

Others smooth

Seams of quartz run diagonally down




‘After all the rain yesterday it is dry. I get up early and walk round the hump of the peninsula to Porth Ledden, a little cove to the north of Cape Cornwall. The tide is out but coming in fast. A strong, cold northerly wind – biting. Down a slippery, pebble-sloped jetty onto the beach. Rounded boulders and huge, towering black rock stacks. Sharp and smooth together. Dark crevices and lit, rounded surfaces. A beach of contrasts.’




I drew directly into my sketchbook on the beach, but one of the aims of the week was to try and produce drawings, in the studio, away from the comfort of the sketchbook. This is something I find very hard to do and I find myself reluctant to try because I find it so difficult. I suppose there is no pressure to ‘get it right’ in a sketchbook, it is purely a personal record – marks to document something I have noticed. A stand alone drawing, on the other hand, has to work in its own right; it has to convey a sense of what the artist saw, heard and felt at the time. It is there to be looked at!

My other difficulty here is, are they drawings or paintings? I never know what to call these works. When does a drawing shift to being a painting? Is it just the media used or is it the intention? I think it is the intention. A drawing is an enquiry. It is a pulling out of information from the mind and the imagination and it is a method of thinking  – a literal drawing out. A painting, for me is what is done when the thinking has happened. It is about paint on paper and mark making and an instinctive response to what is happening  in front of you.


These are works on paper  – drawings – that have jumped out of the sketchbook onto a single sheet of watercolour paper. My aim now is to make them jump again, this time onto a canvas ….. to become paintings. I think some of them may well go quite a lot bigger!


The drawings are on A3 watercolour paper and I re-sized the paper of some of the drawings before starting to alter the proportions. I used watercolour, acrylic, wax resist, and ink.

Brisons Veor – first thoughts

Wow! I’ve been back from Cornwall for a couple of days now and my mind is still buzzing with the many impressions and experiences of the past week.


Of course, I went with expectations and pre-conceived ideas. Before I left, decisions had to be made about the materials to take and these were based on what I thought I would like to do and what I would like to investigate. Naturally, all expectations were confounded, but little glimmers of something new have been planted in my mind as a result.


The sun came out on the last day but its was still cold and windy

The process of exploring a new place, I’ve discovered, can never be pre-judged. There can certainly be tried and tested methods of working, but you never know what the environment, the weather or your own physical and metal state will be at any fixed time. You can only deal with what is happening now.


Out of the studio window

I went to Brisons Veor hoping to work with the sounds of that place. I wanted to listen actively and deeply so that I could understand it aurally. But that didn’t happen quite as I thought it would. Brisons Veor is at Cape Cornwall, a small headland that juts out into the Atlantic. The cottage is the most westerly residence in England. It perches on the edge of a granite cliff and at high tide it is only metres away from a boiling sea. We had ‘winter’ weather. The noise of the wind and the waves was constant. The howling, whistling and roaring virtually blocked out all other sounds. Only occasionally did a faint bird call penetrate the all-encompassing cacophony. I went hoping for a multi-coloured palette of sound but, if this existed, it was drowned out by the natural conditions at that particular time.


There can be no sound without movement and sitting high on the cliff by the coastguard station or down on the beach in the cove there was wild movement everywhere. The wind, eddied and gusted. Heavier gusts buffeted me so that I was physically moved. It whistled through the gap between my head and my hat, it flapped at my my coat and froze my fingers. The act of hearing the wind became confused with being touched by the wind.


Porth Ledden on the other side of the Cape

High on a cliff is, for me, an unfamiliar way of seeing the sea. In Norfolk I look at it from ground level and from that angle there is less sea and more sky. But at Cape Cornwall, from such an elevated position, the sea and sky are almost equal. Below me, the force of the waves is broken by the cliffs and the tall rocks that lie scattered all along the coast. Their crash and roar is a continuous white noise as they break and ebb. All around me is movement and noise, but far out across the waves on the horizon, is stillness and silence. The further the distance the calmer and quieter it gets.


The weather conditions continued for the whole seven days. Each time I stepped out of the cottage I was confronted by the same symphony of wind and waves. Whilst I was there I was disappointed. I felt that this ‘noise’ blocked out the sound detail. But I was wrong. This wildness and movement and sheer, overwhelming sensation was the most important thing about the place at that point in time. The sound was uncontrollable and immense and the movement that produced it was ever-moving, ever-changing and multi-layered.

From my sketchbook:

There is no movement without sound.

There is no sound without movement.

All around me, extending outwards

the duet of sea and wind.

But out on the horizon is stillness.

No sound reaches me from there.

I’m not sure what will come out of these first thoughts. All week I wrote and drew and printed and made. I have collected a lot of data and documented it. Next time I’ll show you some of the things I did and give my thoughts on them ……


I’m really very excited! At the weekend I am going down to Cornwall with fellow artist Mary Morris to stay at Brisons Veor for a week of making and thinking. Brisons Veor is a residential workspace for artists who would like to take time away to concentrate on a specific project.


Our stay there will kickstart a new project that is based on a personal observation and experience of place. Its working title is Along the Same Lines. Working independently from the same points and at the same time, Mary and I will use observations and personal methods of working to document, record and collect information from the environment. Brisons Veor is (almost) the most Westerly point of the British Isles and it will form the first location for the project. We hope to take it on to other locations in the North, South and East.

I’m not taking a huge number of materials with me: mainly things to draw, paint and write with, as the main aim of the week is not only to set the parameters of the project, but also to have the precious opportunity to work closely with somebody else for an extended period of time. I’m particularly  looking forward to this aspect of the week.

There’s no WiFi and little phone signal at the artist’s studio so there will be no electronic distractions. However do keep an eye on Instagram for updates.