Category Archives: photographing

Walking

A blue sky day!

Although I had several things I (probably) should be getting on with it seemed a great shame not to put my boots on and go out for a walk.

P1000326

I chose a favourite route at Holkham that takes the path through the pines behind the beach to Gun Hill and then onto the sand and back along the water’s edge.

P1000331

When I’m out walking I never know what will catch my eye and this time, inspired by the tall, straight pines, I found myself searching out similar lines. Dried willow herb …..

P1000332

and marram grass rise up above the sand dunes and dance gently in the breeze.

P1000336

The sun is quite low in the sky at this time of year and so there are great shadows. In sand ripples created by the recent ebbing tide ….

P1000344

and in a beach river that drains out into the sea.

P1000346 copy

Soft waves make lacy patterns ….

P1000348

and more dynamic lines,

P1000350

and the reflection of the sun in the wet sand makes a dramatic positive/negative as a wavelet draws out.

P1000353

The pines and another beach river create strong parallel lines,

P1000357 copy

and I couldn’t resist poking a few razor shells into the sand to make a set of vertical lines.

P1000364

Finally, a small wave is thrown into relief by a larger one behind creating a long straight line between the two.

Not a bad morning!

Advertisements

Burnham Overy Staithe walk

I often find myself setting rules for the way in which I work. I don’t necessarily mean to do this, but every now and again I find a new routine has crept into my practice.

P1010725Black seed pods on Alexanders

Recently I have been taking my sketchbook with me when I go out for a walk rather than taking my camera. The decision to take a sketchbook is a conscious one as the act of drawing makes me stop and take notice. I believe that to document what I see and hear with drawing increases my perception of the environment and enables me to pay more attention to what is going on around me. Drawing makes me select what I want to record  from my surroundings and gives me the choice about how to put it down on paper. I can select to record what is above, below or around me and I can make notes about the sounds I hear or what I can feel.

P1010711Purple sea-lavender covers the salt marsh

On the other hand, it is very easy to snap a picture with a camera without really looking. Often there is no memory of the experience: the wind on my face or a skylark singing, and there remains only a cropped image of a sensory environment that would have extended 360 degrees around me. Drawing and writing in my sketchbook is my preferred method of documentation.

P1010712Winding channels in the mud

Having said all that, I made a conscious decision the other day to take my camera with me and to try and think about the photos I was taking in order to document my favourite walk at Burnham Overy Staithe. I hope these photos give you an idea of how I see and experience this place.

P1010713Withies mark the channels. They stick up above the water at high tide so you don’t get stuck in the mud.

P1010723Narrow waterways run into the marsh.

P1010720A turnstone feeding on the mud.

P1010736Looking inland across the marsh.

P1010737I used to think this was a submerged boat, but now more of the structure has emerged and I wonder if it is actually part of an old jetty.

Next time I’ll show you drawings done on another walk to Burnham Overy Staithe and the new work that came from them.