Category Archives: exhibiting

Ctrl/Shift

The new 62 Group exhibition opens in 10 days time and I am delighted to have had work selected for it. The work that I submitted for the exhibition is the culmination of all the research and experimentation that I have done on collecting pigments from the local landscape and using it to colour cloth.

P1020395

P1020399_edited-1Ground Cloth: Chalk, Linen, wire, hand-collected and hand-ground chalk, linseed oil, beeswax, sea-water, found threads, 120 x 197 cm

I have called the three cloths in the exhibition Ground Cloths – a play on the word ground: to grind up a material and the place from which the material emanates. The materials I have collected, hand-ground and used in the work are chalk from both Hunstanton and West Runton, yellow ochre from West Runton and sea coal collected from Wells beach.

P1020412

P1020421_edited-1Ground Cloth: Seacoal, Linen, wire, hand-collected and hand-ground seacoal, linseed oil, beeswax, sea-water, found threads, 75 x 279 cm

The brief for Ctrl/Shift was to consider shifts and changes in our practice and to produce work that had moved on or transformed in some way. The Ground Cloths introduce new materials and processes to my practice and I have spent a considerable amount of time researching, exploring and experimenting with the hand-collected materials to make this work.

P1020405Ground Cloth: Yellow Ochre, Linen, wire, hand-collected and hand-ground yellow ochre, linseed oil, beeswax, sea-water, found threads, 106 x 190 cm

Some aspects of my practice have, however, remained and the form of the work takes inspiration from the sails and tarpaulins that are found everywhere here on the coast. The cloths could be considered to be large ‘fragments’ of a sail and the dangling threads take inspiration from reef points that are used to shorten and secure a sail in heavy winds.

P1020410_edited-1

Traditionally, sailors and fishermen would protect sails, ropes and nets by ‘dressing’ them with a mixture of linseed oil, wax and red ochre to give protection from the elements and I have also experimented with, and subtly altered, the traditional techniques of waterproofing and preserving cloth by substituting red ochre with locally-collected materials – chalk, sea-coal and yellow ochre – to produce a blend that both protects and preserves the Ground Cloths and links the materiality of the environment (the actual matter that landscape is made up of) with the utilitarian use of cloth in a coastal location.

The Ctrl/Shift Private view is on Saturday 21 July at the MAC and I have attached an invitation, with details, as you are all welcome to come and celebrate the opening with us and to meet some of the artists.

Screen Shot 2018-07-11 at 09.07.02 copy

Screen Shot 2018-07-11 at 09.07.14 copy

Advertisements

Soundwalking

Yesterday I went along to St. Margaret’s church, Cley-next-the-Sea to deliver and place my work for the Cley 18 exhibition.

P1030629

The brief for this year’s exhibition, curated by Dr Caroline Fisher, is a quote from W.G. Sebald’s The Rings of Saturn,‘The greater the distance the clearer the view’. The Rings of Saturn describes a summer journey up the Suffolk coast where the narrator tells apparently disconnected stories of people and place. The exhibition quote is taken from the part where Sebald talks about the writing of Thomas Browne, ‘the great Norwich physician and writer of the 17th century. It encapsulates the idea that something seen from far away can resolve itself to become clearer than something seen close up or that a long journey can allow us the greatest perspective on a subject. It implies either distance or time between the object and the viewer’.

P1030638

Reading the brief, I knew immediately that I wanted to make a new soundwalk drawing that explored the connection between the visual and aural landscapes of the North Norfolk coast and that it would be a sensory response to my experience of the physicality of the environment; a drawing that placed the emphasis on sound to create an evocation of the passing of time and place and to give a clearer and more focussed interpretation of our multi-sensory world.

P1030636

Inspired by the architect Juhani Pallasma who says that, ‘Hearing structures and articulates the experience and understanding of space. We are not normally aware of the significance of hearing in spatial experience, although sound often provides the temporal continuum in which visual impressions are embedded’, my drawing is a visual journey through time that connects elements contained within both the aural and visual landscape: movement, rhythm, repetition, line, intensity and silence

P1030644_edited-1

The form of the drawing is one that I have used before and is based on musical graphic scores – a method of writing down sound through drawing rather than musical notation. It is inspired by the sounds I hear as I walk and explore the Norfolk coastline: birdsong, the wind, waves, and footsteps.

P1030633

The drawing is called Marsh Soundwalk and it is 1000 x 20.5 cm. It is a watercolour drawing painted on one long piece of paper that I have folded into a concertina book. I have made hand-bound covers for it.

P1030648

You can see Marsh Soundwalk at Cley18,  St Margaret’s Church, Holt Road, Cley, NR25 7TT from 5 July – 5 Aug 2018. The church is open from 10am – 5.30pm daily and there is no charge. There is work by other artists on display at the Norfolk Wildlife Centre and on the beach at Cley and workshops and events are also taking place as part of the exhibition.

Wells Art Trail

P1030608

I’ve just had a wonderful 2 weeks driving around the whole of Iceland. However, I’m not going to talk about that at the moment although I’m sure that in the near future new work will come out of the drawing and writing that I did on my way round the island. If you’d like a flavour of the trip, pop over to my Instagram page where I posted a few highlights.

P1030618

Whilst I was away my work for the Wells Maltings Heritage Art Trail was put up on the quay at Wells by the Maltings hanging team. They have done a fantastic job! It was a thrill to come back and to see my piece hanging between two tall boat masts; gently flapping in the breeze and repeated as its shadow was reflected by the sun on the building behind.

P1030616

The work is called View from the Shipwright’sand it is a representation of the view across Wells Harbour from the residence next to where it hangs on the quay at the East End of Wells called the Shipwrights. The building was formerly a pub called the Shipwright’s Arms and its name gives a clue to the approximate location of a previous boatyard.

P1030614

The work is 2850 x 117 cm and it combines my own artistic practices with simple sail-making and knotwork techniques. It is protected from the weather in the traditional way using bitumen, beeswax and linseed oil. I hope that the materials will do the job over the three months that it will be hanging there.

P1030609

During the 19thcentury the main livelihood in Wells was the trading of grain and coal up and down the coast and many wooden sailing vessels would have been tied up against quay. There were two shipwrights in the town who built and maintained these elegant vessels and provided them with ropes and sails.

 P1030611

View from the Shipwright’s is inspired by the ‘soft’ materials the boatyard’s sailmaker would have used in the 19thcentury: canvas, thread and rope, and uses bitumen and a traditional concoction of beeswax and linseed oil to preserve and protect it from the degenerative effects of the weather. Looking across the marsh from the Shipwright’s Arms 200 years ago a sail maker would have recognised the contours of the land and sea depicted in my work.

P1030612

There are 17 works in Wells Heritage Arts Trail that has been curated by John and Yvonne Milwood and each work has been created especially for the event. The trail takes you around the quay at Wells and onto the beach and it runs from 23 June until Sunday 30 September 2018. There is a free trail guide that can be picked up from the Maltings on Staithe Street, Wells.

 

Exhibiting

I am going to be at the Contemporary Textiles Fair at the Landmark Arts Centre, Teddington all next weekend. For the first time there will be a guest artist at the event and I was absolutely delighted to be invited to exhibit there and to have the opportunity to speak about my work and to give a workshop.

P1010859

Ground Cloth Object: Coil

The Landmark Arts Centre is a former church and I will be showing 3 or 4 Sluice Creek Cloths and a few ‘never before seen’ samples from the series in the Bell Room, and in the main hall I will show a few ‘salt’  Liminal Objects and some small pieces that are part of a new body of work that I am calling ‘Colour from the Landscape’.

Ground Cloth Fragment - Chalk

Ground Cloth Fragment: Chalk

It will be a busy weekend with the talk and short workshop. The talk is on Saturday at 12.00 noon and I’ll be speaking about the influences on my work and the materials I use. There will be photos, sound, samples to touch and sketchbooks to look at – a multi-sensory event.

dsc_2414

Sluice Creek Cloth: Masts and Halyards 1

In the workshop we will be making different types of paint from materials that I have gathered from the landscape. Hopefully we’ll have time to grind up the pigments, make paint (including watercolour) and try them out.

P1030716

Liminal Objects: Wrack

I’m really looking forward to this event. I enjoy meeting people and this is the perfect opportunity.

This is what the catalogue says about the exhibition.

‘Local artist Debbie Lyddon has been invited back to the Contemporary Textiles Fair this year to exhibit her work inspired by the coast, and what she notices when walking through the landscape. Lyddon’s often sculptural, pieces evoke moody skies and sweeping scenery, without becoming a direct representation of a particular vista. Her experimentation with non-traditional materials such as bitumen and dried out sea salt, alongside her main staple; cloth, introduces an element of conscious, process-based decision making; informed by natural environment’.

The Sewing Machine Project at the Knit & Stitch show

I’ve got the car packed to the gunnels with Studio 21 work as we are having another showing of The Sewing Machine Project. This time it is at the Knitting & Stitching show and we will be at all three of the shows: London, Dublin and Harrogate.

P1230028

This is a great project – full of thoughtful, inspirational work and well worth a look; or if you have already seen the work ….. a second look! If you are at any of the shows please do go and say hello to the Studio 21 members who would love to see you.

I’ll be showing two works: Fold and Seam.

P1230027

P1230031

P1030114

 

 

Burnham Overy Staithe walk – drawing and collage

Last time I showed you photos taken on a walk to Burnham Overy Staithe and today I am showing you some drawings and the work that came from them.

As always, I document what I notice about the conditions on that particular day and on that day I wrote in my sketchbook:

The sky and sea reflect each other.

There is so much light.

The land is in relief against it – a dark, almost featureless mass.

Shape – light – dark.

P1040436

It was a grey day and the tide was out. Huge expanses of wet, shimmering mud were exposed and were reflecting the light from the sky so that a pale grey light almost totally filled my view. If I squinted, half closing my eyes, the overall impression was of dark land silhouetted against the pale sky and mud.

P1040441

My interest was not the detail but in the sinuous, muddy shapes formed by small channels and creeks that cut the marsh with ebbing and flowing tides.

P1040437

I looked at the light, the dark and the in-between tones.

P1040440

In the foreground a scribble describes the chaotic, abundance of late summer wild flowers and plants.

P1040438

These collages have been made in response to the drawings. They evoke the light of the mud and sky and the heavy, dark shape of the marsh on that day. The colour is subdued and there is just enough detail to suggest the natural rhythms of the aural and visual landscape. Each collage is 20 x 40cms, mounted on 18mm board and has a waxed linen ‘frame’.

P1040424 web

P1040423 web

P1040433 web

P1040435 web

P1040429 web

P1040427 web

These collages will be exhibited at the Cranleigh Arts Centre, 1 High Street, Cranleigh, Surrey, GU6 8AS, from  5-16 September as part of The Makers’ Art 2017, The Society of Designer Craftsmen, North Surrey Group. The exhibition is open from 10am – 4.30pm and entry is free.

Chalk Ground installation

P1010486

Yesterday I spent the day at St Margaret’s church in Cley-next-the-Sea installing my work ‘Chalk Ground’ and I’m very happy with how it looks. I never know quite how things will be until the work is in situ and often something unexpected shows itself as it is put in place. In this case it was the light.

P1010494

It was a bright day and the sun was pouring through the beautiful window above. I knew that the fine wires hovering over the top of the ‘tubes’ would catch the light but I hadn’t realised how much the work would change as the sun moved westwards throughout the day.

P1010484_edited-1

In the morning shafts of sunlight highlighted the lefthand side of the work and as the hours passed the light gradually moved along the 2 metre work, accenting or leaving in shadow different sections until finally by late afternoon the sun had moved away and the work was in the shade.

P1010508

P1010487

I love to work with the specific conditions of a space and to be able to manipulate the work to fit the setting. In this instance I added more wires to increase the shimmering miasma above …… the beautiful light was a very welcome and serendipitous addition!